Why New Zealand Now? blog4NZ

Why go to New Zealand now?

Because if you love *landscape*,

New Zealand is your dream destination.

If you’ve had yearnings to see the fjords of Norway, the geysers of Iceland, the lowlands of  Scotland or the Alps of Switzerland save yourself the angst of the manic European traffic, and the hoards (250million) of tourists and see all these remarkable landforms in New Zealand without having to traipse from one end of Europe to the other.

New Zealand superimposed over Europe Map

New Zealand superimposed over Europe Map*

*Editor’s note: The map above is from the 1919 official NZ year book 

Whilst Christchurch, a month ago, may have been shaken,

the rest of the country was not stirred!

New Zealand is as deliciously beautiful, unspoilt, natural and welcoming as ever.

If you want to see the Norwegian fjords? Head to Milford Sound in the south-west of New Zealand’s  South Island. Rudyard Kipling considered Milford Sound to be the 8th wonder of the world, where sheer rock cliffs are a mile from peak to ocean floor.

Milford Sound, New Zealand

Photo by 'Mister Wind-Up Bird' Eric Brochu

Want to experience the glaciers in Austria? Check out the Franz Joseph Glacier on the mid west coast of South Island

Franz Joseph Glacier, New Zealand

Photo by 'bluetravie' Thomas Lee

The Swiss Alps? Feel the magnificence of the Southern Alps that forms the backbone of New Zealand’s South Island.

Southern Alps, New Zealand

Photo by 'katclay' Kat Clay

The beauty of the lakes in northern Italy are a draw card for many celebrities to set up home, but if you prefer your scenery without the glitz head to Mt Cook & Lake Pukaki – The photo below is taken on the road to Mt Cook Village, South Island. The lakes in New Zealand are numerous and all exquisitely pristine.

 

Mt Cook & Lake Pukaki New Zealand

Photo by Valley_GuyGraeme

A trip to Europe wouldn’t be complete without some French wine, so spoil yourself in Marlborough. New Zealand wines are winning many international awards, so are not to be sniffed at ;)

Marlborough, New Zealand

Photo by Phillip Capper

For a taste of the Mediterranean? Head to Whakatane in the Bay of Plenty on New Zealand’s North Island.

Whakatane, New Zealand

Photo by Catching Magic

The variety of climatic landscapes in New Zealand extends itself from lush verdant rainforest (which is a bonus you’d never get to see in Europe!) to the arid interior reminiscent of Spain’s dry interior. Below is a ruin at the old gold mining settlement of Bendigo in Central Otago, roughly between Queenstown and Dunedin on South Island.

The Central Otago Bendigo old gold mining settlement

Photo by Neville10

And approaching Dunedin (near Lee Stream) one feels as though one is entering the lowlands of Scotland.

near Lee Stream inland from Dunedin

Photo by Stephen Murphy

Forget about having to go to Iceland to see geysers - The furthest north you’ll have to go is onto the North Island at Waiotapu Thermal area near Rotorua.

Waiotapu Thermal Area, New Zealand

Photo by Daves Portfolio

Or if you’re a tree hugger and forests are your want,  the Black Forest of Germany has some serious competition with the Waitakere Ranges below…

Waitakere Ranges, Auckland, New Zealand

Photo by Sandy Austin

New Zealand… It’s not only picture perfect…

It’s Paradise ;)

Paradise, New Zealand

Photo by Zanthia

Here is the road that leads up to Paradise, and being a No through Road – There’s No Exit!

Road to Paradise, New Zealand

Photo by Zanthia

With a backdrop of dramatic mountains, reflected in glassy lakes, the road out of Queenstown on South Island takes you over babbling stoney river crossings up into a valley of verdant woodland.

Paradise was one of my favourite places when touring New Zealand ~

If you haven’t yet been?

Its to die for ;)

If you have… share *your* heavenly spot in the comments below…

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16 thoughts on “Why New Zealand Now? blog4NZ

  1. Of all the landmarks you listed above the equator I am so blessed to have seen most… yet so typical, I’ve seen less of what is closest to home! Now that I live back in Australia, my plan is to see more of my home land and NZ! The photo’s you’ve compiled are such a fantastic ad for inspiring anyone to head over and enjoy what NZ has to offer!

    Good on you for supporting NZ!
    Sally Foley-Lewis recently posted..Delegation RoadblocksMy Profile

    • Fantastic that you’ve had the opportunity to see so many magical landforms in the northern hemisphere ~
      Look forward to hearing about your expeditions into the Ozzie outback and when you get to NZ how you enjoy revisiting all those European landscapes in the compact version (minus the crowds ;))

    • New Zealand is a playground for virtually all sports!
      Extreme, adventure, team & individual pursuits…
      Ski-ing, snowboarding in the winter ~ Hiking and biking in the summer :)

    • As a lover of landscape I love New Zealand!
      The variety in such a compact space… without the crowds… and as you say, if you’re in the southern hemisphere, its only a hop, skip and a jump away :)

  2. it’s one of my fav places in the world really – the south island – otago – aramoana … just a delight of peace, calm and tranquillity with such an element of ‘wild’ thrown in for good measure – love it!

    • I love your perfect description… “peace, calm and tranquillity with an element of ‘wild’ thrown in”
      I’m with you about New Zealand :)

  3. New Zealand is such a wonderful place. I’ve been living here on a working holiday for the last 8 months and have enjoyed living in the beautiful winterless Far North. It’s such a special place in the world – the conscious effort of the nation as a whole towards environmentalism and conservation is an attitude that ALL NATIONS should adopt. I love it here!

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